Difference between revisions of "Polyamorphic systems"

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(General reading)
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Some solid compounds can exist in two or more '''polymorphs''' with different atomic structures but the same chemical composition.
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In the case of a pure element, this behavior is termed '''allotropy''' (Ref. 2).
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The existence of liquid polymorphs is known as '''polyamorphism''', i.e. the ability of a substance to exist in several different amorphous modifications.
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Note: glasses are not in thermodynamic equilibrium, so such transformations do not correspond to true phase transitions from one stable liquid to another (Ref. 1).
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===Polyamorphic systems===
 
*[[Germanium]]
 
*[[Germanium]]
 
*[[n-butanol]]
 
*[[n-butanol]]

Revision as of 15:28, 30 April 2007

Some solid compounds can exist in two or more polymorphs with different atomic structures but the same chemical composition. In the case of a pure element, this behavior is termed allotropy (Ref. 2). The existence of liquid polymorphs is known as polyamorphism, i.e. the ability of a substance to exist in several different amorphous modifications. Note: glasses are not in thermodynamic equilibrium, so such transformations do not correspond to true phase transitions from one stable liquid to another (Ref. 1).

Polyamorphic systems

General reading

  1. Paul McMillan "Phase transitions: Jumping between liquid states", Nature 403 pp. 151-152 (2000)
  2. Jeff L. Yarger and George H. Wolf "Polymorphism in Liquids", Science 306 pp. 820 - 821 (2004)