Difference between revisions of "Polyamorphic systems"

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Some solid compounds can exist in two or more '''polymorphs''' with different atomic structures but the same chemical composition.
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'''Polyamorphic systems''' and liquid-liquid transitions. Some solid compounds can exist in two or more ''polymorphs'' with different atomic structures but the same chemical composition.
In the case of a pure element, this behavior is termed '''allotropy'''.
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In the case of a pure element, this behavior is termed ''allotropy''.
The existence of liquid polymorphs is known as '''polyamorphism''', i.e. the ability of a substance to exist in several different amorphous modifications.  
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The existence of liquid polymorphs is known as ''polyamorphism'', i.e. the ability of a substance to exist in several different amorphous modifications.  
 
Note: glasses are not in thermodynamic equilibrium, so such transformations do not correspond to true phase transitions from one stable liquid to another.
 
Note: glasses are not in thermodynamic equilibrium, so such transformations do not correspond to true phase transitions from one stable liquid to another.
 
===Polyamorphic systems===
 
===Polyamorphic systems===
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[[Realistic models | Real systems]] that present liquid-liquid transitions:
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*[[Carbon]]
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*[[Gallium]]
 
*[[Germanium]]
 
*[[Germanium]]
*[[n-butanol]]
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*[[Butanol |n-butanol]]
*[[Phosphorous]]
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*[[Phosphorus]]
*[[polyamorphism: Ramp model | Ramp model]]
 
*[[Roberts and Debenedetti model]]
 
*[[Hemmer and Stell model]]
 
 
*[[Silica]]
 
*[[Silica]]
*[[Silicon potential | Silicon]]
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*[[Silicon]]
 
*[[Triphenyl phosphite]]
 
*[[Triphenyl phosphite]]
 
*[[Water]]
 
*[[Water]]
 
*[[Yttria–alumina]]
 
*[[Yttria–alumina]]
==General reading==
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#[http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.267.5206.1924 C. A. Angell "Formation of Glasses from Liquids and Biopolymers", Science '''267''' pp. 1924 - 1935 (1995)]
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==Models==
#[http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.275.5298.322 Peter H. Poole, Tor Grande, C. Austen Angell, Paul F. McMillan "Polymorphic Phase Transitions in Liquids and Glasses", Science '''275''' pp. 322 - 323 (1997)]
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[[Idealised models]] that present liquid-liquid transitions:
#[http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/35003088 Paul McMillan "Phase transitions: Jumping between liquid states", Nature '''403''' pp. 151-152 (2000)]
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*[[Buldyrev and Stanley model]]
#[http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1104417 Jeff L. Yarger and George H. Wolf "Polymorphism in Liquids", Science '''306''' pp. 820 - 821 (2004)]
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*[[Hemmer and Stell model]]
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*[[polyamorphism: Ramp model | Jagla ramp model]]
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*[[Roberts and Debenedetti model]]
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*[[Square shoulder + square well model]]
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*[[Henriques and Barbosa model]]
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==References==
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<references/>
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;Related reading
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*[http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.267.5206.1924 C. A. Angell "Formation of Glasses from Liquids and Biopolymers", Science '''267''' pp. 1924 - 1935 (1995)]
 +
*[http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.275.5298.322 Peter H. Poole, Tor Grande, C. Austen Angell, Paul F. McMillan "Polymorphic Phase Transitions in Liquids and Glasses", Science '''275''' pp. 322 - 323 (1997)]
 +
*[http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/35003088 Paul McMillan "Phase transitions: Jumping between liquid states", Nature '''403''' pp. 151-152 (2000)]
 +
*[http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1104417 Jeff L. Yarger and George H. Wolf "Polymorphism in Liquids", Science '''306''' pp. 820 - 821 (2004)]
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*[http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/b401308p Paul F. McMillan "Polyamorphic transformations in liquids and glasses", Journal of Materials Chemistry '''14''' pp. 1506-1512 (2004)]
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*[http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0953-8984/17/43/L01 Peter H. Poole, Ivan Saika-Voivod and Francesco Sciortino "Density minimum and liquid–liquid phase transition", Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter '''17''' pp. L431-L437 (2005)]
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*[http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/b517775h Martin C. Wilding, Mark Wilson and Paul F. McMillan "Structural studies and polymorphism in amorphous solids and liquids at high pressure", Chemical Society Reviews  '''35''' pp. 964-986 (2006)]
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*[http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/35055514 Giancarlo Franzese, Gianpietro Malescio, Anna Skibinsky, Sergey V. Buldyrev, and H. Eugene Stanley "Generic mechanism for generating a liquid-liquid phase transition", Nature '''409''' pp. 692-695 (2001)]
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*[http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.115706 Megan J. Cuthbertson and Peter H. Poole "Mixturelike Behavior Near a Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Simulations of Supercooled Water", Physical Review Letters '''106''' 115706 (2011)]
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*[http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3593441 G. Makov and E. Yahel "Liquid-liquid phase transformations and the shape of the melting curve", Journal of Chemical Physics '''134''' 204507 (2011)]
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*[http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4967939  Debdas Dhabal, Charusita Chakravarty, Valeria Molinero and Hemant K. Kashyap "Comparison of liquid-state anomalies in Stillinger-Weber models of water, silicon, and germanium", Journal of Chemical Physics '''145''' 214502 (2016)]
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[[category:Complex systems]]
 
[[category:Complex systems]]

Latest revision as of 15:05, 12 December 2016

Polyamorphic systems and liquid-liquid transitions. Some solid compounds can exist in two or more polymorphs with different atomic structures but the same chemical composition. In the case of a pure element, this behavior is termed allotropy. The existence of liquid polymorphs is known as polyamorphism, i.e. the ability of a substance to exist in several different amorphous modifications. Note: glasses are not in thermodynamic equilibrium, so such transformations do not correspond to true phase transitions from one stable liquid to another.

Polyamorphic systems[edit]

Real systems that present liquid-liquid transitions:

Models[edit]

Idealised models that present liquid-liquid transitions:

References[edit]

Related reading