Editing Maxwell speed distribution

Jump to: navigation, search

Warning: You are not logged in. Your IP address will be publicly visible if you make any edits. If you log in or create an account, your edits will be attributed to your username, along with other benefits.

The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.
Latest revision Your text
Line 18: Line 18:
  
 
==Derivation==
 
==Derivation==
βˆ’
According to the '''Shivanian and Lopez-Ruiz model''' <ref>[http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physa.2011.12.041 Elyas Shivanian and Ricardo LΓ³pez-Ruiz "A new model for ideal gases. Decay to the Maxwellian distribution", Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications '''391''' pp. 2600-2607 (2012)]
+
According to the '''Shivanian and Lopez-Ruiz model''' <ref>[http://arxiv.org/abs/1105.4813 Elyas Shivanian and Ricardo Lopez-Ruiz "A New Model for Ideal Gases. Decay to the Maxwellian Distribution", arXiv:1105.4813v1 24 May (2011)]</ref>, consider an [[ideal gas]] composed of particles having a mass of unity  in the three-dimensional (<math>3D</math>) space. As long as there no privileged direction when in  equilibrium, we can take any direction in  space and  study the discrete time evolution of the velocity distribution in that direction. Let us call this axis <math>U</math>. We can complete a Cartesian system with two additional orthogonal axis <math>V,W</math>. If <math>p_n(u){\mathrm d}u</math> represents the probability of finding a particle of the gas with velocity component in the direction <math>U</math> comprised between <math>u</math> and <math>u + {\mathrm d}u</math> at time <math>n</math>, then the probability to have at this time <math>n</math> a particle with a <math>3D</math> velocity <math>(u,v,w)</math> will be <math>p_n(u)p_n(v)p_n(w)</math>. The particles of the gas collide between them, and after a number of interactions of the order of system size, a new velocity distribution is attained at time <math>n+1</math>. Concerning the interaction of particles with the bulk of the gas, we make two simplistic and realistic assumptions in order to obtain the probability of having a velocity <math>x</math> in the direction <math>U</math> at time <math>n+1</math>: (1) Only those particles with an energy greater than <math>x^2</math> at time <math>n</math> can contribute to this velocity <math>x</math> in the direction <math>U</math>, that is, all those particles whose velocities <math>(u,v,w)</math> verify <math> u^2+v^2+w^2\ge x^2</math>; (2) The new velocities after collisions are equally distributed in their permitted ranges, that is, particles with velocity <math>(u,v,w)</math> can generate maximal velocities <math>\pm U_{max}=\pm\sqrt{u^2+v^2+w^2}</math>, then the allowed range of velocities <math>[-U_{max},U_{max}]</math> measures <math>2|U_{max}|</math>, and the contributing probability of these particles to the velocity <math>x</math> will be <math>p_n(u)p_n(v)p_n(w)/(2|U_{max}|)</math>. Taking all together we finally get the expression for the evolution operator <math>\mathcal T </math>. This is:
βˆ’
[http://arxiv.org/abs/1105.4813  arXiv:1105.4813v1 24 May (2011)]</ref>, consider an [[ideal gas]] composed of particles having a mass of unity  in the three-dimensional (<math>3D</math>) space. As long as there no privileged direction when in  equilibrium, we can take any direction in  space and  study the discrete time evolution of the velocity distribution in that direction. Let us call this axis <math>U</math>. We can complete a Cartesian system with two additional orthogonal axis <math>V,W</math>. If <math>p_n(u){\mathrm d}u</math> represents the probability of finding a particle of the gas with velocity component in the direction <math>U</math> comprised between <math>u</math> and <math>u + {\mathrm d}u</math> at time <math>n</math>, then the probability to have at this time <math>n</math> a particle with a <math>3D</math> velocity <math>(u,v,w)</math> will be <math>p_n(u)p_n(v)p_n(w)</math>. The particles of the gas collide between them, and after a number of interactions of the order of system size, a new velocity distribution is attained at time <math>n+1</math>. Concerning the interaction of particles with the bulk of the gas, we make two simplistic and realistic assumptions in order to obtain the probability of having a velocity <math>x</math> in the direction <math>U</math> at time <math>n+1</math>: (1) Only those particles with an energy greater than <math>x^2</math> at time <math>n</math> can contribute to this velocity <math>x</math> in the direction <math>U</math>, that is, all those particles whose velocities <math>(u,v,w)</math> verify <math> u^2+v^2+w^2\ge x^2</math>; (2) The new velocities after collisions are equally distributed in their permitted ranges, that is, particles with velocity <math>(u,v,w)</math> can generate maximal velocities <math>\pm U_{max}=\pm\sqrt{u^2+v^2+w^2}</math>, then the allowed range of velocities <math>[-U_{max},U_{max}]</math> measures <math>2|U_{max}|</math>, and the contributing probability of these particles to the velocity <math>x</math> will be <math>p_n(u)p_n(v)p_n(w)/(2|U_{max}|)</math>. Taking all together we finally get the expression for the evolution operator <math>\mathcal T </math>. This is:
 
  
  

Please note that all contributions to SklogWiki are considered to be released under the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike (see SklogWiki:Copyrights for details). If you do not want your writing to be edited mercilessly and redistributed at will, then do not submit it here.
You are also promising us that you wrote this yourself, or copied it from a public domain or similar free resource. Do not submit copyrighted work without permission!

To edit this page, please answer the question that appears below (more info):

Cancel | Editing help (opens in new window)